If Matt Kemp isn't ready by Opening Day, that could leave the door ajar for outfielders Joc Pederson and Scott Van Slyke. Photo: Jayne Kamin-Oncea-USA TODAY Sports

The Ugly Truth, The Dodgers are Old School


This is a new era in sports, and it’s up to the Dodgers to catch the last train (actually, it’s already left the station). The Post-Steroid Era is upon us, and it is characterized by smarter: play, training regimes, and tactical acumen. Now I know we haven’t seen “small ball” or smart play since the early 80s. What we’ve grown accustomed to are brute strength, unnatural healing times, and severely diminished strategy—across all elements of the game.

Ned Colletti talked highly of Juan Uribe at Blogger Night. Photo: Stacie Wheeler

Ned Colletti talked highly of Juan Uribe at Blogger Night. Photo: Stacie Wheeler

Steroids had turned baseball into CliffsNotes—a cheap facsimile of the real thing. And while the Dodgers may know basic truths—we need a power hitter in the clean up spot—like CliffsNotes, The Dodgers will not test well in the end. The smarter, shrewder, more disciplined student of Baseball will make the Dodgers look cavalier, arrogant, and reductionist. It comes from the top down and we can only look at Ned Colletti and think that he might not be the sharpest tool in the shed—let’s say least modern tool, as well.

Why am I so enraged? Because Ned Colletti is ruining careers. Careers! Matt Kemp has been rushed back too many times, let alone never really had a good talking-to about his hot dog play leading to injuries. Poor Rod Stripling is out for a year-and-a-half at least. Carl Crawford was asked to gun the engines too soon—no 33-year-old should ever be asked to run from 1st to 3rd in February!!!! Yasiel Puig showed up to camp 20 pounds overweight and people are actually wondering why he’s injured? Take a wild guess. He’s out of shape.

This is not the way to take care of your players. You ease the vets in. Peterson will definitely get a chance this year, because blowing out stars is something we shine at. Firing our head trainer is not the solution. It’s systemic. We have to start looking to other ball clubs. This is the Post-Steroid Era! Stretching. Yoga. Pilates. Health food is not some far-flung idea. It’s the only way! Sorry, guys weaned on the 80’s and 90’s, I know it’s not sexy, but do you want to win or just look like a dinosaur who thinks the sun will always shine on him? The Dodgers look more than beatable this year. Their attitude being behind the times, it’s only a matter of time–unless they get hip

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Tags: Matt Kemp The Los Angeles Dodgers Yasiel Puig

  • LasordasLair

    Well, I don’t think it’s Colletti’s fault specifically. I blame the trainers, and the medical staff. I don’t think they have been doing their jobs properly.

    • AaronKnuckleCurve

      Come from the Top Down. Who makes the call? Also, if Colletti wanted to sit Puig as punishment for any one of his miss steps, that would be good too. I love Puig, but he needs consequences enforced.

    • AaronKnuckleCurve

      And now Puig’s injured.

  • R3aLdoe Foo

    Obviously the players have to maintain personal responsibility as well. Management can always have the highest standards or intentions, but unless the player(s) commit to their own health or future, they will not last. Sports leagues should be able to borrow a page from the NFL’s playbook and not have to guarantee contracts anymore. Many players take advantage of this in the MLB and NBA and collect paychecks while they’re injured or even when healthy. A healthy player who underperforms is worse than an injured one. I agree, diet and proper training are fundamental – though, the Lakers have the best nutritional and physical training programs and still have been plagued by injuries. Let’s be honest, some of it boils down to luck as well. Let’s face it, the Dodgers were pretty close to going all the way last year and fell short at the end – hitting and some strategic mistakes cost them big. Their pitching didn’t pan out, yet was very strong, and appears to be back on track with the returns of Beckett and Bills. Not to mention, the additions of Haren and up and coming minor league talent. Losing faith in the direction of the team and how its managed shows a lack of patience and a wanting of “Too much, too soon” attitude. Its only been a few years since McCourt dealt the team to Guggenheim and they’ve been trying to repair the damage of the last 3 regimes of ownership (4 if you include Bob Daly). there is much pressure to perform when you have had such a dramatic turn around in the direction of ownership management and operations, potential and roster, as well as recent success of the Giants. Fandom can not lose faith and have to ride out storms of poor trades, health, and player personal responsibility. Puig came back overweight and Ryu came in shape.Let spring training end before we even make start dropping criticisms. Even when the season starts, teams start slow and hit a stride. Some teams, start hot too fast and burn out or peak too early. Let’s be patient, have faith in our Dodgers, and may luck be in our favor.

    • AaronKnuckleCurve

      I completely think you are RIGHT! i am impatient. I get exasperated when I see management overplay these guys. But’s it’s MLB too–they’ve shortened MY teams pre-season. Last year I had to watch Hanley go down before the year even started because he was playing somewhere else! I wanted to present my least filtered, most impulsive views with this article and I fully expected a wise soul to point out my impatience. So, the thing we can agree on, we’re all pullin for the Blue.

      • R3aLdoe Foo

        Yes, it is very frustrating. Though, baseball is supposed to be entertainment. Let’s enjoy it! Last year is over and we’ve got 160+ games to endure.

    • AaronKnuckleCurve

      One more thing. I DO think Mattingly made errors last year in the playoffs. I do feel he played us like an AL team, and wouldn’t try “small ball” enough–imho